Slaughterhouse blues book review

The modern poultry production industry factory farming started with Mrs. Historians looking for a comprehensive history of these industries will need to go elsewhere, for the authors deal with the antecedents to contemporary trends quickly, omitting many details and nuances.

Great locations and suspense. How fast would you like to get it. He received his doctorate from the University of Colorado, Boulder, inand a master's degree in public health from the University of California, Berkeley, in Faced with this choice, millions of families abandoned farming as both a profession and a lifestyle.

The advents of railways and refrigeration triggered a shift in the industry of meatpacking from a local and seasonal business into a year-round and nationwide industry.

Pioneers kept hogs as free-range animals that foraged for their food. Bill is confident he can out-run the handful of undesirables on his trail, but his grand exit strategy hits a major roadblock in the form of a posse of small-town criminals whose initial southern hospitality proves unfortunately short-lived.

Their chapter "Not In My Backyard: I feel that the authors presented their findings which were extremely well and long-researched in a logically efficient and consistent manner. Cue more love, more bullets and more imaginative bloodshed.

Contracted chicken growers working for these businesses under their specifications came to replace independent chicken farmers working for themselves. Moreover, Stull and Broadway explain the reasons that firms prefer these methods as well as the powerful economic incentives for farmers to participate—for example, the declining demand for tobacco that was once Kentucky's staple crop.

Taking the cheap and easy route may sound like a great idea at face value, but if it is done so at the expense of quality, safety, and overall wellbeing, it hardly worth it in my opinion.

Slaughterhouse Blues

Poultry production is the focus of chapter three. The book really did change the way I think about the meat that I consume every day and where it comes from and where it was before that. The division of the book into chapters leading from agricultural industrialization as a whole, to the individual histories of the meatpacking industry, all the way to the current state of the industry as seen by the workers in it and the communities around it.

Corn-fed pigs grew faster and bigger, so it was common practice to round up surplus hogs and corn-feed them in the weeks before they went to market value is weight-based.

He is very proud of the outline of the story that he draws in crayon on the back of a roll of wallpaper. The authors point out that agriculture is currently in the middle of its third revolution. Before long, it was figured out that by taking advantage of supplements and vitamins, growers ould raise poultry completely indoors.

Their criticisms are delivered in careful, measured tones and balanced by competing information and interpretation. From there, much like their agricultural counterparts, the people and the companies that founded the meatpacking industry are now replaced by the very same transnational corporations.

Rather than risk repeating himself, in Slaughterhouse Blues Kolakowski whisks his protagonists Bill and Fiona off to Cuba and Nicaragua, respectively — furthering the storyline and dragging the characters even further out of their comfort zone. Faced with this choice, millions of families abandoned farming as both a profession and a lifestyle.

In a book of fewer than two hundred pages there are limits. Bill and Fiona are great characters- Fiona i This book has it all- perfectly coifed assassins, Romance, drugs, shoot outs, a crotchety old man, and Nazi gold.

Taking the cheap and easy route may sound like a great idea at face value, but if it is done so at the expense of quality, safety, and overall wellbeing, it hardly worth it in my opinion.

It is so short and jumbled, he explains, because there is nothing intelligent to say about a massacre. In Kentucky we hear not only the critics of the ecological impact of concentrated poultry raising but also the farmers who find it an excellent source of revenue.

The authors point out that agriculture is currently in the middle of its third revolution.

Book Reviews: A Brutal Bunch of Heartbroken Saps + Slaughterhouse Blues by Nick Kolakowski

I feel as if reading it has given me a better knowledge concerning the food that I buy and the entities I am supporting with my money. While conditions are better and workers work alongside helpful machines, jobs on the line remain boring and monotonous.

The first chapter in the book discusses the processes behind the birth of industrialized agriculture in North America after the Second World War, with a notable focus on the changing structure and location of beef, pork, and poultry processing.

Early chapters open with powerful first-person descriptions of slaughtering facilities and farming operations before moving to the historical development of the beef, pork, and chicken industries.

The industrialized system behind what we eat is one of the most controversial points of political interest in our society today. Book Reviews Slaughterhouse Blues: The Meat and Poultry Industry in North America. By Donald D. Stull and Michael 1.

Broadway. Belmont, CA: ThomsonlWadsworth. Slaughterhouse Blues is a welcome introduction to their research, as well as a concise description of the contemporary red meat and poultry industries. The volume is published in the series Case Studies on Contemporary Social Issues, and it combines ethnographic accounts with contextual historical narrative.

SLAUGHTERHOUSE BLUES: THE MEAT AND POULTRY INDUSTRY IN NORTH AMERICA draws on more than 15 years of research by the authors, a cultural anthropologist and a social geographer, to present a detailed look at the meat and poultry industry in the United States and Canada.3/5(1).

Slaughterhouse Blues: Book Review Essay. Metress Slaughterhouse Blues: Book Review Michael Farhoud Slaughterhouse Blues: Book Review Michael Farhoud In Slaughterhouse Blues, anthropologist Donald Stull and social geographer Michael Broadway explore the advent, history, and implications of modern food production - Slaughterhouse Blues: Book Review Essay introduction.

SLAUGHTERHOUSE BLUES: THE MEAT AND POULTRY INDUSTRY IN NORTH AMERICA draws on more than 15 years of research by the authors, a cultural anthropologist and a social geographer, to present a detailed look at the meat and poultry industry in the United States and Canada/5.

[Email address] ANTH S. Metress ANTH S. Metress Slaughterhouse Blues: Book Review Michael Farhoud Slaughterhouse Blues: Book Review Michael Farhoud In Slaughterhouse Blues, anthropologist Donald Stull and social geographer Michael Broadway explore the advent, history, and implications of modern food production.

Slaughterhouse blues book review
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Project MUSE - Slaughterhouse Blues: The Meat and Poultry Industry in North America (review)